Sin and Shame

I have heard it said that the actual definition of sin is not “committing a morally bad act” but rather “missing the mark”.  In other words, sin is not an act that makes you a bad person necessarily.  Rather, sin is a mistaken act or an act that takes you where you actually do not want to go.  Another way of saying this is that sin is coming short of the glory of God.  These two definitions of sin are vastly different.

The morally bad sin implies shame.  The act is morally bad and therefore the person who commits the act is morally bad.  Accordingly, the sinner really wants to commit the sinful act (through the urging of the ego and the limbic system).  The sinner knows that it is bad and proceeds to commit the act anyway.  After the act is committed the sinner feels guilty and seeks forgiveness.  Psychologically, the Super Ego (which is the Prefrontal Cortex overlaid with shame) tells the sinner he is morally wrong for sinning.  This is a cycle of shame.  This is also a cycle of addiction because shame does not feel good and cannot be sustained forever.  If bad feelings continue over an extended period of time the ego and the limbic system kick in again and attempt to relieve the consciousness  of the bad feeling.  It then seeks out the short-term fix which is the sinful behavior.

According to the “sin as missing the mark” way of thinking, the sinner thinks that committing the sinful act will bring about some kind of desired result.  This desired result is typically a short-term benefit (as in the case of addiction).  Again, the sinner is encouraged to act by the ego or limbic system which hijacks consciousness and thinks in terms of short-term gains.  After the act is committed the ego and limbic system are satiated and relinquish control of consciousness.  At this point the prefrontal cortex assumes control again and recognizes that the short-term benefit is not worth the long-term ramifications.  If shame is removed from the process, the sinner realizes the mistake and seeks to rectify it.  Sin becomes a learning experience and if properly educated the prefrontal cortex is strengthened and the true self becomes more awake.  This is the path to enlightenment.

What I am attempting to describe is how shame corrupts morality.  In order for an act to be moral it cannot be motivated by shame.  Nor can it be rectified by shame after the fact.  Morality has to come from the heart.  It has to be an actual desire and goal.  It cannot be something one does to avoid humiliation.  This is inauthentic and devoid of joy.  In order to enter into the fullness of God’s glory one must truly enter into the fullness of the true-self.  This can never be done through shame because shame sets the self against the self.  Whereas, the lines of demarkation are blurred between the true-self and God.  Their interests and motivations are ultimately aligned and perhaps cannot truly be described as separate entities.

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